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Watch Anthropocene: The Human Epoch

Anthropocene: The Human Epoch is a movie starring Alicia Vikander. Filmmakers travel to six continents and 20 countries to document the impact humans have made on the planet.

Genres
Documentary
Director
Jennifer Baichwal, Nicholas de Pencier, Edward Burtynsky
Starring
Alicia Vikander

All Systems Operational

Product details

Genres Documentary
Director Jennifer Baichwal, Nicholas de Pencier, Edward Burtynsky
Writer Jennifer Baichwal
Stars Alicia Vikander
Country Canada
Also Known As Antropocenas: zmogaus era, Antropocen: Epoka czlowieka, Antropocene - L'epoca umana, Anthropocène: L'époque humaine, Antropocen - människans epok
Runtime 1 h 27 min
Audio Português  English  Deutsch  Italiano  Español  Français  Gaeilge  Svenska  Nederlands
Subtitles Português  日本語  Čeština  Australia  한국어  Filipino  Tiếng Việt  हिन्दी 
Quality 480p, 720p, 1080p, 2K, 4K
Description Filmmakers travel to six continents and 20 countries to document the impact humans have made on the planet.

Top reviews

Sunday, 13 Sep 2020 07:38

This documentary is a must see for anyone who wants to be informed about our changing climate and our impact on the planet. As an avid climatologist, I can tell you that we are going to experience a change in the climate as a result of the human emission of CO2. We have already passed the tipping point. We are rapidly moving to a new world with increasing temperatures and less ice cover. Over the past 100 years, the planet's average temperature has increased by 0.6 degrees F. A 3 degree increase in temperature is projected for the next few decades. The question that remains is how much can we go without a global catastrophe. Climate change is not a distant problem, it is here and now and it is here to stay. The Earth's climate is changing and will continue to change. The changes are a result of human activity and will be either a good or a bad thing. If the future is not good, humans may just be able to recover or survive without any help from our environment. The human race will be forced to adapt to the changing climate and there is no guarantee that this will be good. The same goes for our environment. The question is how we are going to survive and whether or not we will be able to recover or survive as a species. To the extent that we adapt to the changing climate, we may or may not be able to recover from the effects of global warming. This is a very good documentary that I highly recommend. It is well-made and has a great message. It's very timely, it gives you a good understanding of what is at stake for the future of humanity.
Tuesday, 28 Jul 2020 23:28

This film is based on the Gaia hypothesis which states that the Earth's biosphere was not fully populated and therefore no life can be described as thriving. (It's essentially a search for its replacement.) Some believe that this means the planet is heading for a catastrophic breakup. If so, it will be extremely hard to find a place where life will be particularly healthy. In this film, Tars Tarkovsky, a former Soviet scientist and renowned Soviet cinema critic, presents one such place. He has been moved to observe life and death in various districts of the old USSR. All the inhabitants of the district that includes his old village are dying. Tarkovsky is a poet who has produced several works of art and literature. He lived in an open-air studio in the town of Malaga, but was forced to move in when he was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. After spending several months with the villagers, he thinks they will all die. He is wrong. They still live. After his film, the chief of the district tells him that they will all live until the end of the world. There are almost two million of them. That's a lot of people to go through. The survivors survive on an average diet of 1.5 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per day. There are no restrictions. They still have a wide variety of foods to choose from. They can use every method of contraception, including a child. The only thing that they all have in common is the consumption of livestock and plants. They have an average of 150 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight. In addition, they are given some basic medical treatments to prevent blood loss and preserve organs. The villagers also have access to a hospital. Some, however, do not have the means to travel to the hospital. For them, the journey can be difficult, with a very long journey time, and expensive transportation. "Most of the people are huddled in small cabins. Every hut has a bucket with water," says one man. "The older men and women tend to the young men, or they might join the men for the trips to the hospital. They tend to be the ones who will die," he explains. There is no need for transportation. They take horses or donkeys for transport. They are of different nationalities and speak the same language. These people are willing to risk their lives for their country. They don't eat or drink anything harmful to them or their livestock. These people have seen their children die from eating bad food. Many of them have never been in a hospital. Most of the visitors have died in the last few years. "In that village, there are only six other men, all of them near the age of 80. But they all have one thing in common. They all eat meat," says Tarkovsky. "Meat is banned in the village. There are five reasons why. One, they just can't afford to buy it." But Tarkovsky doesn
Sunday, 28 Jun 2020 21:06

We see a close-up of the People's Republic of China's new train depot - while it is being constructed, the cameraman explains how the human race is trying to convert Earth into a sustainable and densely populated place. Eventually, we see a close-up of a human fetus, but for a short period. It's a complex subject. This is a movie that moves quickly. We have the China Railway station in Beijing, then the North Korean border. Then we see a robotic arm stretching across the desert to fill a silo. From there it is to Manchuria, then to Shanghai, then to Hong Kong, and finally to Beijing. We see a handful of industrial plants in Shanghai, each of which was threatened with closure. There is much talk of the "Little Tokyo" and "Da Nang" - even if the film is limited to just one country. It is not an action movie; it is not a documentary. There are no celebrities to move the story along, no great images of architectural marvels, nothing. It is a human documentary with a documentary director. This is not your ordinary documentary. As the documentary moves forward we are shown different pictures, ranging from the environment, to the relations between humans and non-humans. It is a personal journey from the people of China to the people of the world. The film takes us to different places, and you will find yourself lost in the trip. We end up at Beijing, the North Korean border, to a thriving economy in Beijing, and then to the Yunnan Province of China. There is lots of info about culture, from shamans to Taoism, from herbs to acupuncture. There are even more spiritual stories about how different cultures relate to each other and to each other. I found the film to be interesting and interesting to be taken on. It was very educational. There were no flashy montages of the film; it was very laid back. It's not a Hollywood style movie. It is very calm. Overall, this was a great film. It will be something for people who want to know more about what is happening to the environment and human beings. Overall, I give it an 8/10.
Wednesday, 24 Jun 2020 16:41

So why does this documentary about the Anthropocene bother me so much? It's not that the story is lacking in substance. There is certainly a lot of interest in how humanity has gone from our hunting-gathering ancestors to the civilization we live in today and the implications this has on the rest of the world. The film seems to go in and out of trying to tell us exactly how the world will look in 10,000 years, but ultimately ends up not coming across very convincing and lacking in nuance and insight. Rather, it tries to tell us a lot of little tidbits of information we already know, but it never explains what that knowledge means or how it ties into humanity as a whole. For instance, the film talks about how the Anthropocene is a sort of time warp, but never really shows how this does or why this is a bad thing. Perhaps that's because it's the audience's knowledge that we're trying to impart on the film that will save us. I certainly don't mind what the film tells us, but it's a little hard to swallow the message it gives. On the other hand, the film does touch on important issues that don't have a definitive answer (the economy and the future of the planet, perhaps?), but is delivered with a pretty serious tone and that's a big plus. Overall, I'd say this film is a very decent effort, but it fails to make a compelling case for the Anthropocene. It's more a case of trying to explain the Anthropocene, rather than give you a reason to care about it.


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