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Watch The Russian Five

The Russian Five is a movie starring Jeff Daniels, Jim Devellano, and Sergei Fedorov. In the late 1980s, the Detroit Red Wings worked to finally break their decades long Stanley Cup drought by extracting players from the Soviet...

Genres
Documentary, Sport
Director
Joshua Riehl
Starring
Jeff Daniels, Jim Devellano, Sergei Fedorov, Viacheslav Fetisov

All Systems Operational

Product details

Genres Documentary, Sport
Director Joshua Riehl
Writer Joshua Riehl, Keith Gave, Jason Wehling
Stars Jeff Daniels, Jim Devellano, Sergei Fedorov, Viacheslav Fetisov
Country USA
Runtime 1 h 42 min
Audio Português  English  Deutsch  Italiano  Español  Français  Gaeilge  Svenska  Nederlands
Subtitles Português  日本語  Čeština  Australia  한국어  Filipino  Tiếng Việt  हिन्दी 
Quality 480p, 720p, 1080p, 2K, 4K
Description In the late 1980s, the Detroit Red Wings worked to finally break their decades long Stanley Cup drought by extracting players from the Soviet Union, and in the process, changed the way North American hockey is played.

Top reviews

Tuesday, 25 Aug 2020 08:17

I'm not sure if this was intended to be a documentary about the 'Russian Five' or a collection of clips from the first two movies, but it is quite interesting. As for the clips, they range from the stupid (a bus driver watching the 'Russian Five' try to walk on the left side of the road and the bus driver trying to follow the Russian Five) to the somewhat intriguing (a man looking at a naked woman in a bar, the Russian Five on a train, a woman on a bus with a man, a woman on a train with a man, a man on a bus with a man, etc.). If you're a fan of the first two, this is a great place to start, if you're not, it's a great place to start. There are some great interviews with the actors, but that's about it. The only part of the documentary that I didn't like was the running commentary from the director of the first movie. I really wish that the director had had more input into the first two movies. It's not like he was the only one that knew what he was doing, but I don't think that the movie was perfect. I think that the first movie was better, but not perfect, and the second movie was good. It's a shame that they didn't have the opportunity to make the third movie, because I think that it would have been great. The first two movies are just not as good as the third movie, and I think that the third movie would have been great. I think that the third movie would have been a perfect follow up to the first two movies. It would have been a perfect time for the Russians to step up to the plate and be the best of the best.
Monday, 13 Jul 2020 01:42

In 1998, a tennis player named Maria Sharapova became a national champion. Sharapova had a checkered history with the Russian federation. She was a victim of domestic violence, and the Russian tennis authorities confiscated the talent that she had in the Soviet Union. Sharapova made an attempt to avoid deportation to Siberia by playing in the 1996 Olympic Games in Los Angeles, California. Sharapova was a favorite of Russian President Vladimir Putin, and Putin personally praised Sharapova's performance. At the 1996 Olympic Games, Sharapova suffered an injury, and she was suspended from the Olympic program for three years. She was forced to travel to California for treatment, but returned to play in the 1998 World Cup. Her recovery was remarkable, as she became a top-10 tennis player in the world. Sharapova received a break in the Russian federation, but she was returned to her home country. Sharapova continued to play in the 1997 and 1998 seasons. In 1999, Sharapova and three of her teammates were arrested in a high-profile investigation. They were charged with corruption. The Russian authorities seized the coach's record books, and took Sharapova and two others to Siberia. She was accused of taking $4.8 million from her sponsors, and she spent one month in solitary confinement in the Siberian city of Khabarovsk. Despite the charges, Sharapova continued to play in the 1998 and 1999 seasons. In 2001, Sharapova returned to the U.S. to play in the 2008 Olympics in Beijing, China. Sharapova had a difficult time adjusting to life in America. Sharapova was given a drug test for a banned substance in the U.S., and the test result indicated that she had been taking the drug for the last 12 years. The results were considered a red flag that would affect her future participation in the Olympics. Sharapova's agent, Charles Powell, tried to reach out to Sharapova, but was unsuccessful. Sharapova was forced to forfeit her title in the 2004 Olympics in Athens, Greece, because the results of the doping test were a secret. After the 2004 Olympics, Sharapova was held in solitary confinement in the Siberian city of Khabarovsk. She was forced to give up all of her rights as a citizen of Russia. In 2005, Sharapova was given another opportunity to return to the Olympic Games in Beijing, China, but she chose to retire. After she announced her retirement, Russian President Vladimir Putin announced that she would not be allowed to play in the 2005 Winter Olympics in Moscow, Russia. The Russian authorities said that Sharapova would have to leave the country and re-enter Russia for re-testing. Sharapova appealed to the Russian court system, but her appeal was denied by the court. In 2006, Sharapova was arrested in France for not paying the $500,000 fine levied by the French authorities for her role in the doping scandal. She was released on bail, but she failed to pay the fine. The Russian authorities released her


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