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Tenet is a movie starring Elizabeth Debicki, Robert Pattinson, and Aaron Taylor-Johnson. An action epic revolving around international espionage, time travel, and evolution. Possibly about a man trying to prevent World War 3 through...

Genres
Action, Drama, Thriller
Director
Christopher Nolan
Starring
Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Elizabeth Debicki, Robert Pattinson, Kenneth Branagh

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Product details

Genres Action, Drama, Thriller
Director Christopher Nolan
Writer Christopher Nolan
Stars Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Elizabeth Debicki, Robert Pattinson, Kenneth Branagh
Country USA, UK
Also Known As Merry-Go-Round, 天能, テネット, TENET天能, Untitled Christopher Nolan Project, Untitled WB Event Film
Audio Português  English  Deutsch  Italiano  Español  Français  Gaeilge  Svenska  Nederlands
Subtitles Português  日本語  Čeština  Australia  한국어  Filipino  Tiếng Việt  हिन्दी 
Quality 480p, 720p, 1080p, 2K, 4K
Description An action epic revolving around international espionage, time travel, and evolution. Possibly about a man trying to prevent World War 3 through time travel and rebirth.

Top reviews

Sunday, 16 Aug 2020 22:00

After a ten year hiatus from the public eye, and for those who read this, you will know that the views of John A. McGivney, aka Mr. Tenet, and Director Sam Peckinpah, aka Mr. Peck, are in their own ways polar opposites. Mr. McGivney is, at heart, a pretty simple minded man. He has an affinity for his subject matter, which he can be fair about in the narrative sense, and will leave the audience with the impression that the movie will be more profound than it is. On the other hand, Mr. Peck is always there to sell the movie as the most profound movie ever made. Mr. Tenet is equally as apt to engage the audience in conversation, and it's never a bad thing to do so, as it gives you that opportunity to examine the movie from an analytical angle. The truth is, Mr. Tenet is probably the more intellectually interested of the two, and the first to promote Tenet's version of Tenet's "The Enemy Within", a novel based on the real life events of William Buckley Jr. and the American Conscience. Tenet's version of Buckley's book was a remarkable book, in the sense that it presented a fascinating look at the right-wing movement in the 1970's and how it was able to turn the lives of citizens, even those who supported the left-wing, upside down in a matter of seconds. However, ten years later, Tenet's movie-adaptation of Tenet's novel has no such element of mystery, which makes the film feel more of an exercise in entertainment than a legitimate film. In addition, Mr. McGivney's film is a bit too far removed from the truth, which makes it seem more like a documentary than a documentary. The cast in the movie is, in my opinion, the weakest part of the film. Kevin Costner is, at heart, an intelligent man, and has some good things to say, but he is, at the end of the day, not the lead actor in the film. Sarah Jessica Parker's role is so weak, in my opinion, that it's hard to take her seriously, and she just seems like she's trying to cover herself in a little cloth. Charles Durning and Alan Arkin are solid in their roles as Tenet and Peck, but neither is given much to do. Only Arkin and Arkin have a couple of scenes, both of which are almost useless. Some of the casting is just weird. Tenet is in the movie, but he is never seen with a gun, and he is never given the
Sunday, 02 Aug 2020 06:13

Director Soderbergh, who was in that small, rather innocuous role as the Coen brothers' lead screenwriter on "The Big Lebowski", found himself in one of those rare, and often bizarre, spots where he finds himself directing a serious film, and he created a tense, unflinching, often disturbing, largely incoherent, and entirely unrelatable film that has to be seen to be believed. "Sully" is an odd mix of personal tragedy, corporate greed, and gun-running, and Soderbergh manages to juggle these elements successfully enough, though, in spite of being generally absent of anything that would make his viewers care or sympathize with the characters or their situations, he still manages to make for an exceptionally entertaining and highly-engaging film, that is more about atmosphere and atmosphere alone than action or violence. In fact, one of the things that I liked most about this film is that, while it is a drama that features characters facing a serious tragedy, it also features characters that are dealt with in a style that is quite reminiscent of the "Citizen Kane" and "Casablanca" styles of film making. This is the case of a film that starts out with a man being killed, who then manages to dodge his own (and the police's) bullets, as he attempts to escape a gunman who is hunting down a man who is on the run, who is hiding out in a train station. The character here is played by Tom Hanks, who goes into an intensive rehab for PTSD that he suffered as a result of his PTSD, and although Hanks was in a role where he was more or less supposed to be playing a likable character, he also managed to make the character extremely well-realized and believable, and he was given the most memorable and energetic performance of the film. His counterpart, Josh Brolin, who plays the similarly-minded brother to Hanks, also manages to be extremely well-written, as well. The idea of these two characters is that they are both very talented, and skilled, but that they are dealing with serious life-threatening issues, and, in the film, they both end up in rehab for the most part, and the reason for that is because they were in a different era, as opposed to being in an "atypical" age, and the way the film handles that aspect of the film is completely seamless, as the characters are only saved from certain death at the hands of certain people who have a vested interest in their own survival. The second aspect that is highly noticeable is that the film is extremely brutal, and one of the


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